News

Push Songs September / October 2014

21 August 2014

Attention Victorian songwriters! Push Songs’ innovative and inspiring song writing mentoring program continues throughout September and October 2014 and again it’s FREE!

To develop your song writing skills, successful applicants will take part in 3x one-on-one song writing workshops, plus be invited to join the Tuesday Night Song Club and meet and share ideas and live performance opportunities with fellow song writers. The workshops are also moving into an afternoon/evening time to make it more accessible for students and workers.

Working alongside Push Songs Co-ordinator Charles Jenkins will be a bevy of highly experienced song writing mentors including Georgia Fields, Mikelangelo, Ainslie Wills and Kevin Mitchell (Bob Evans, Jebediah).

Participants from all corners of the state of Victoria and of any age are encouraged to apply for the Brunswick-based program.

Push Songs applications close Friday 29th August 2014.
Fill out the easy application form here: www.surveymonkey.com/s/PS3-2014  

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CONTROL: The Business of Music Management

21 August 2014

The new trans-Tasman edition of CONTROL, the program for music managers from Australia and New Zealand, is now calling for applications.

CONTROL is the dynamic five-stage programme designed to assist music managers from Australia and New Zealand grow their businesses. Mid-career music managers from both sides of the Tasman are encouraged to apply. The programme is presented by the Australian Music Industry Network (AMIN), and supported by Australian Association (AAM) and the Music Managers Forum of New Zealand (MMF NZ).
 
CONTROL will incorporate two residential labs to be held near Sydney, the first from 23-26 November 2014. Six music and business advisers including Paul McKessar (Manager of Brooke Fraser, The Naked and Famous, Lydia Cole, Breaks Co-op) and Correne Wilkie (Manager of The Cat Empire, Jackson Jackson, Harry James Angus) will work with participants on their leadership skills and business models.
 
CONTROL will provide participants with practical business guidance. It will include a comprehensive review of the different business models found in the contemporary music sector, as well as deep analysis of each business model brought to the lab. This will be the first time that managers from New Zealand will also take part in the programme.
 
 CONTROL application forms and guidelines are available from the AMIN, AAM and MMF NZ websites: www.amin.org.au; www.mmf.co.nz; www.aam.org.auApplications close Monday 29th September 2014.


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Review of State Environment Protection Policies for Noise - have your say

7 August 2014

EPA Victoria (EPA) and the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI) have commenced a review of the two State Environment Protection Policies for noise (the noise SEPPs).

The objectives of the review are to:

  • determine the best way to protect the community from unreasonable commercial, industrial and music noise, while supporting business (including Victoria’s live music industry) and encouraging economic growth; and
  • ensure that any regulation of commercial, industrial and music noise is appropriate, effective and capable of being understood by businesses and the community.

SEPP N-2 applies to music noise from public premises such as pubs, nightclubs, outdoor entertainment venues, restaurants, public halls, gymnasiums and retail stores. SEPP N-2 covers all of Victoria.

A discussion paper and short survey has been released to support the first stage of public consultation. The Noise SEPPs review discussion paper is open for comment until 15 October 2014. The paper is for the general community, businesses, acoustic consultants, planning professionals, local and state government agencies and other interested parties.

As an alternative to making a submission on the discussion paper, a short survey is available to assist you to provide feedback on commercial, industrial and music noise. The survey is available here

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Update on the Agent of Change and live music venues

4 August 2014

As announced today in The Age, the Victorian Government will shortly make changes to planning regulation that will enshrine Agent of Change in planning law.

Alongside SLAM and FairGo4LiveMusic, Music Victoria has been working on this reform since it released the Industry Position Paper to the Live Music Roundtable in 2012. Yet some of our policy team, including Music Victoria board members Jon Perring and Ashley Admiraal, and Dr Kate Shaw, have been trying to push it through since the 2003 Live Music Taskforce recommended that Agent of Change was necessary in planning law to better balance the rights and responsibilities of live music venues, developers and residents. So when you next see them out, make sure you buy them a drink of their choice.

The Government’s package, announced today, features five components. The first two involve liquor licensing and planning laws recognising the Agent of Change Principle. While the Labor Government introduced the principle in 2004, it was just a practice note and didn’t have legislative teeth. Once gazetted (hopefully next month), live music will have its own “particular provision” to ensure that the Agent of Change applies statewide. The Government has also announced $500,000 in grants to venues with heritage listings and others that fall between the cracks, as well as the release of the EPA’s long overdue review of noise standards.

Overall, it’s a great package and a big win for the music industry. We have something worth protecting, and by addressing the issues in our 2012 position paper, the Government has listened and acted on our recommendations.

But there are some important fine details that we need to work on with the Government to ensure that all of our members are captured by this reform, particularly around the Particular Provision and the definition of live music, so that non-licensed creative spaces can be saved from encroaching development. After all, they are an essential feeder into the live music chain. 

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CEO report July 2014

4 August 2014

Two of the goals for Music Victoria this year were to persuade the legendary Daddy Cool to “Come Back Again” and accept an induction into The Age Music Victoria Awards Hall of Fame with a special performance, and to persuade the State Government that the Agent of Change Principle was not only common sense, but essential to protect our thriving live music scene. 

Both wishes have come true. We announced Daddy Cool’s induction in The Age last Friday, and the show at at 170 Russell on Wednesday 19th November is well on the way to selling out (the Music Victoria members pre-sale was exhausted over the weekend – see you there!).

Once again The EG Allstars house band will fire up, with guests including Russell Morris, Stonefield, Jess Cornelius (Teeth & Tongue) jumping up to sing one of their own songs from this year, as well as a song from the Daddy Cool era. Davey Lane will also play tribute to the late Jim Keays. Tickets to The Age Music Victoria Awards 2014 are $50+bf via 170Russell.com. Get in quick as they are on the way to selling out already!

Now onto the issue of live music reform. As announced today in The Age, the Victorian Government will shortly make changes to planning regulation that will enshrine Agent of Change in planning law. Alongside SLAM and FairGo4LiveMusic, Music Victoria has been working on this reform since it released the Industry Position Paper to the Live Music Roundtable in 2012, yet some of our policy team have been trying to push it through since 2003. 

The Government’s package features five components, with the first two involve liquor licensing and planning laws recognising the Agent of Change Principle. While the Labor Government introduced the principle in 2004, it was just a practice note and didn’t have enforceable legislative teeth. Once gazetted (hopefully next month), live music will have its own “particular provision” to ensure that the Agent of Change applies state-wide.

Overall, it’s a great package and a big win for the music industry. We have a live music community in Victoria worth protecting, and by addressing the issues in our 2012 position paper, the Government has listened and acted on our recommendations.

But there are some important fine details that we need to work on with the Government to ensure that all of our members are captured by this reform, particularly around the Particular Provision and the definition of live music, so that rehearsal studios can be saved from encroaching development. After all, they are an essential feeder into the live music chain and a crucial part of the music eco-system.   

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